School of Science and Technology Faculty

Dr Merkouris Karaliopoulos

Course(s):Computer Networks
Wireless Communications and Networks

 

Dr. Merkouris Karaliopoulos is currently a Researcher in the Information Technologies Institute of the Center for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), in Greece. He is also a visiting Researcher in the Department of Informatics, in the Athens University of Economics and Business (AUEB). He was awarded his diploma in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, in 1998 and a Ph.D. degree in broadband satellite networking from the University of Surrey, UK, in 2004. He has been a Postdoctoral researcher at Computer Science Department of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA (2005-2006), and a Senior Researcher and Lecturer at the Department of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, in ETH Zurich (2007-2010), Switzerland. Before joining CERTH, he was a Marie-Curie Fellow at the Department of Informatics and Telecommunications, University of Athens, Greece.

His research interests lie in the broader area of wireless and mobile social networks, currently focusing on mobile crowdsensing, opportunistic networking, and collective awareness platforms. He has worked in a series of EU FP5, FP6 and FP7 projects in the areas of wireless terrestrial and satellite communication systems and socio-aware computing, holding both technical and managerial roles. He has been member of the program committee of several conferences and workshops and an invited member of expert panels in these research areas. He has also served in the organizing committee of the Autonomic and Opportunistic Communications (AOC) workshop in 2011 and 2012.

He has taught courses in the area of computer networks and mobile computing at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland, the University of Athens, Greece, and the Open University of Cyprus.

 

 

 

 

Computer Networks

Teaching Hours and Credit Allocation: 30 Hours, 6 Credits
Course Assessment: Exam & Coursework

 

Aims

This course will examine computer networks within the context of the Internet. We will study the fundamental principles, elements, and protocols of computer networks. We will investigate how the different protocols work, why they work that way, and their performance trade-offs. Using this knowledge, we will try to examine the way applications are deployed on the Internet and their performance trade-offs. In particular, we will try to examine some strategies that are commonly used to accelerate application level performance in the context of the operation of the Internet.

 

Learning Outcomes

On completing the course students will be able to:

  • Explain the operation of a range of computer networking applications such as email, web, and peer-to-peer file-sharing
  • Relate the architecture of the Internet to the underlying design principles
  • Illustrate the operation of common routing protocols, queuing mechanisms, and congestion control mechanisms
  • Develop elements of a network such as gateways and routers that conform to IETF standards with acceptable levels of simplification
  • Explain the performance of a given set of routing protocols, queuing mechanisms, and congestion control mechanisms on an example network.

 

Content

  • Introduction to Computer Networks
  • Sockets Programming
  • Protocol Stacks and Layering: Application Layer, Physical Layer, Link Layer Basics.
  • Switching & Flow Control
  • Ethernet and Bridging
  • IP forwarding & addressing
  • IP Packets & Routers
  • Routing: RIP & OSPF, Routing: BGP, Multicast, DNS, IPv6, tunnelling, NAT, VPN, Virtual circuits, ATM, MPLS, Transport Intro.
  • TCP & Congestion Control.
  • TCP Performance
  • Multimedia/QoS, QoS & Mobile (IP & TCP)
  • Ad-hoc networks
  • Web + CDNs + Caching, P2P
  • Security - SSL, Security - firewalls, DoS
  • Broadband access networks (xDSL,UWB, DOCSIS)

 

Reading

Kurose J. F., Ross K. W. (2007) Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach, Addison Wesley, 6th edition.

Peterson L. L., Davie B. S. (2007) Computer Networks ISE: A Systems Approach, Morgan Kaufmann; 4th edition.

Stallings W. (2008) Data and Computer Communications, Pearson Education, 8th edition.

Wireless Communications and Networks

Teaching Hours and Credit Allocation: 30 Hours, 6 Credits
Course Assessment: Exam & Coursework

 

Aims

The course aims at studying fundamental principles of current and forthcoming mobile and wireless networks. Building on the knowledge gained during the 1st term course on Computer Networks, it analyzes how the basic networking operations are affected by the additional challenges of mobile and wireless environments but also the particularities of novel networking paradigms that are currently in the phase of research or initial/experimental deployments. Hence, the course covers cellular networks (mobile macrocellular and local area ones), but also more distributed and user-driven networking and service paradigms such as wireless multihop and opportunistic networks, as well as participatory sensing and mobile crowdsensing.

 

Learning Outcomes

By successfully completing the course students are expected to have:

  • understood the particular challenges that wireless and mobile (distributed) environments place on basic networking operations
  • gained knowledge about fundamental design principles (e.g., cellular architecture, mobility management) that address these challenges and developped basic network design skills
  • familiarized themselves with different cellular communication technologies and standards (3G, LTE, WLANs) for engineering mobile cellular networks
  • developped a good a understanding of novel, highly distributed, wireless networking paradigms such as wireless ad hoc networks and opportunistic networks and the way networking is realized over them
  • been exposed to the latest trends in the area of participatory sensing and mobile crowdsensing, which combine the power of the crowdsourcing principle with the growing functionality of smart mobile devices

 

Content

  • Challenges for the operation of mobile and wireless networks
    • user/device mobility, wireless environment
  • Fundamental principles of mobile cellular networks:
    • cellular architecture (frequency reuse, sectoring, capacity vs. coverage)
    • mobility management (macro- and micro-mobility, handovers), location management
  • Current cellular systems and standards:
    • GSM/GPRS, 3G, LTE, WLANs
  • Network-, transport- and application-layer adaptations for wireless environments
    • Mobile IP, TCP enhancements, proxies
  • Wireless multihop and ad hoc networks
    • additional challenges due to their distributed operation
    • routing metrics (ETX, WCETT) and routing protocol (DSDV, DSR, OLSR) solutions and tradeoffs
    • transport solutions (non TCP solutions, hop-by-hop)
  • Opportunistic networking (Delay Tolerant Networks)
    • the store-carry-and-forward principle, intermittently connected networks
    • forwarding and routing under deterministic mobility (controlled flooding vs. utility-based and socioaware approaches)
  • Participatory networking and mobile crowdsensing
    • smart spaces and pervasive computing
    • sensor/smartphone selection, incentive provision, applications

 

Reading

Schiller J. (2003) Mobile Communications, Addison Wesley, 2nd edition.